The Glasgow Dumfriesshire Society

Screen-Shot-2014-10-21-at-19.09.38Many Highland Scots, on moving to the urban centres of the Lowlands, established clubs and societies there. What is a little-known fact, however, is that Lowland Scots too utilised associationalism in this way, for instance when having moved from rural areas to cities. In Glasgow, for instance, the Dumfriesshire Society was very active. The Society was founded in 1869 as an amalgam of the Glasgow Nithsdale Society, which had been established in the mid-1860s, and the Dumfriesshire Benevolent Society formed earlier in 1869. It was thought that, given the similar objectives of the organisations, combining efforts would be a sensible move. As the Glasgow Herald reported, ‘[t]his event was happily accomplished’, and the Glasgow Dumfriesshire Society was formed on 10 December 1869. The Duke of Buccleuch and Queensberry and George …

Bringing the Empire to Scotland

When thinking about the Scottish Diaspora it is important to recognise what diaspora actually means. Traditionally the word refers simply to the movement of people, i.e. describing the migration of Scots and other groups away from their homeland. More recently the term diaspora has primarily been associated with victimhood and forced dispersal from a homeland. Another important characteristic of a diaspora is the continued connection with the old world. This connection, however, works both ways: while many Scots resident in the diaspora were keen to maintain links with Scotland, many a Scot who stayed there was keen to learn more about the sites in which Scots had settled. For those whose family members lived abroad there was a very immediate reason for this interest, but even for those who had …