Sir Walter Scott: A Writer with Global Appeal

ScottWhen novelist and poet Sir Walter Scott died at his home, Abbotsford House near Melrose, in late September 1832, the press in Scotland was full of praise for, as the Caledonian Mercury put it, ‘this illustrious writer’ and ‘great luminary of letters’. Though not normally described as Scotland’s national bard – this being a title usually reserved for Robert Burns – Scott was immensely popular. Best known for his novels, including Ivanhoe, Rob Roy, The Lady of the Lake, Waverley and The Heart of Midlothian, Scott’s popularity, as the Mercury’s obituary went on to stress, rested on him having ‘boldly struck into a new path … evoking all that was most grand, gorgeous, and romantic in the past history or traditions of a land singularly rich …

The Scots in Australia

Thanks to a Visiting Fellowship at the Humanities Research Centre, Australian National University (Canberra), and a grant by the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, I got to spend the last two months in Australia, giving me time for some further explorations of the Scots who settled there for my next book, as well as for a new project in which I am investigating the material culture of Scottish associations. So on my departure from Australia I thought I’d write a post about the Scots here.

Overall, between 1861 and 1945, the Scots made up a good 15% of the UK-born migrants in Australia – the Scots were, therefore, the third largest migrant group after the English and Irish. While a larger number of Scots, almost a quarter, settled …

Sir Harry Lauder and the Scottish Diaspora

On 26 February 1950 Sir Harry Lauder, the famous Scottish entertainer Winston Churchill once referred to as ‘Scotland’s greatest ever ambassador’, died in Strathaven, Lanarkshire. Lauder’s story is a remarkable, and one that directly connects him to the Scottish Diaspora.

Born near Edinburgh on 4 August 1870, Lauder’s mother moved the family to Arbroath after the death of Harry’s father. It was there that Lauder, aged 12, started work in a local mill. Two years later, the family relocated to Lanarkshire, where Lauder became a pit boy, working in a coal mine. Ever since his father’s death, Lauder had, however, also enjoyed singing, and it was singing that should make him famous all over the world. He began to get paid engagements and then joined a concert part, touring Scotland, …

The Scottish Diaspora and the Story of St Kilda

StKildaOn 29 August 1930 the remaining residents of St Kilda were evacuated from the island on economic grounds at the islanders’ own request as the population had dwindled from 73 in 1920 to only 37 in 1928. There is, however, a much longer history of departures from the island, and one directly connected to the Scottish Diaspora.

When, in October 1852, 36 St. Kildans left the island to emigrate to Australia, the Glasgow Herald observed that it was the first emigration from that remote island to the distant shores of the Antipodes. ‘The cause of humanity would be served’, the paper went on, were that emigration to continue ‘until all inhabitants have been removed from the barren rock’. Whether this was a sentiment shared by the emigrants themselves is not …